Utility

The Ecstasy of Living

Recorded on: 
17.09.2010

David: The reason why we were designed in embodiment was so that we could taste the ecstasy of living. You can call it compulsory joy. The Buddhists, of course, have a hard time with this. For them relativity is a bad trip. It's a bum trip because they look at it from the standpoint of loss. Not what’s gained, not the affluence that produces manifestation. The super abundance within Being that gave birth to everything. But they just look at that narrow area where everything is passing into its dissolution phase. Going toward death and so that tints their view to such an extreme degree that they're not interested in anything else. They're interested in ending the cycle of rebirth, which has a certain amount of intelligence built into it. There is a stroke of intelligence in that.

Participant: Well, I think that philosophy comes from people who have experienced life as pure pain and are trying to make sense of it. So you're talking about this experience of joy. But if your experience of relativity is all pain how can I access what...

David: That's why I said there is a stroke of intelligence in it.

Participant: Right, right but I want to make a leap. I'd rather tune into the abundance. It’s just if life is all pain, what makes a difference? You know. You can't make your life all pain.

David: You can't, but Being can bless you in such a way, through divine intoxication, that you being to sense the joy aspect.

Participant: Yes, but that’s Being’s choice.

David: Being doesn't choose. I understand, though, what you mean. But you also understand that it's not really a choice on the part any conscious entity, whether to give you misery or him joy.

Participant: Well then, those words are meaningless so...

David: Very good. They are meaningless in an ultimate context. But you just affirmed misery so I need to talk to you in some language. Both are here. It’s absolutely dismal, that aspect is there. There is a stroke of truth to what the Buddhists affirm, the Theravada Buddhists. But then, there is also a pure joy element. Something that is radically on fire with exuberant and ...

Participant: All right, so if it's not a conscious will to make that shift from misery to joy, then what is one to do besides showing up?

David: It can entail lifestyle choices, to reacquaint the body with certain relative joys. Like there is a joy in movement, for example, in physical movement. So if you’re miserable all the time, there may be an open doorway to happiness through simply exploring physical movement. Whether it be a, a silent walk in a beautiful place or going swimming in some beautiful lake up in Northern California, going to the hot springs. Even in a small way you can access joy in that way. It can begin a, a path of opening into joy. It may not be everything that you're looking for right from the beginning. But you can crack open the sensation of joy in relativity. Does that make sense?